Speeding is a factor in nearly one-third of all automobile-related fatalities, according to a report from the Governors Highway Safety Association. Yet speeding is considered culturally acceptable among many drivers in Pennsylvania and across the U.S., and this mindset cannot be changed except through better education and stricter law enforcement, among other things.

This is the claim of the GHSA. In April 2019, the GHSA and the Institute for Highway Safety will be convening a forum with major stakeholders in the generation of a speeding reduction program. This can then be implemented by the GHSA’s State Highway Safety Offices. Members of these state offices can do much to spearhead educational and enforcement efforts as well as coordinate stakeholder alliances.

It’s a fact that even a slight decrease in travel speed can drastically reduce crash and injury severity. This can save lives, especially those of pedestrians and bicyclists. New York City, Boston and other urban areas have successfully reduced vehicle speeds through the alteration of speed limits.

The GHSA has found, though, that more speeding-related deaths occur in rural and suburban areas. There were more than 5,000 such deaths on rural roadways in 2016 alone. The organization is thus calling for an expansion of the concept and principles of Vision Zero (a project aiming for zero roadway fatalities) to focus on these neglected regions.

As for the victims of auto accidents caused by speeding or another form of negligence, they may want to see a lawyer about filing a claim. They might be eligible for damages that cover their medical expenses, property damage, lost income and other losses. The auto insurance company will likely fight to deny the claim, but victims could ask their lawyer if he or she can negotiate for a settlement. Third-party experts might come in to gather the necessary evidence.