Daylight-saving time begins in just a few short weeks. On March 8, 2020, you must remember to turn your clocks forward an hour. If you are like many of your neighbors, the time change is a bit disconcerting. After all, you are apt to exchange an hour of sleep for one of morning darkness. Even worse, daylight-saving time may put your life in danger.

According to a recent study, fatal car accidents are 6% higher in the week after daylight-saving time begins than they are during any other week of the year. Because you probably cannot skip commuting to work during this dangerous week, you should understand the enhanced risk. Here are a couple of reasons it is dangerous to drive immediately after daylight-saving time starts:

Drowsy driving 

You likely understand the inherent dangers of drunk driving. You may not realize, however, that drowsy driving can be just as risky. That is, if you do not have adequate rest before climbing behind the wheel, you may have slower reflexes and cognitive abilities. Nevertheless, until your body adjusts to daylight-saving time, you may miss out on an hour of sleep. If you are already operating on a lack of rest, the further depletion of sleep may increase your chances of having a serious car crash.

Dark commutes 

The days are always either getting longer or shorter. Still, for most of the year, the process is gradual, allowing you to adjust slowly to darkness. That is not the case with daylight-saving time, though. Instead, your morning commute may turn from light to dark overnight. You may also have to once again contend with glare from the morning sunrise during your commute.

You may have been through dozens of daylight-saving adjustments in your life. Still, the week after the time changes can be hazardous for motorists. If you drive to work every day, taking steps to minimize the time-change risk is essential.